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Speed dating sheffield showroom

speed dating sheffield showroom-43

The trims were attached by a u shaped bracket bolted at each end to the hub.A spring clip in the centre of the bracket passed through a slot in the centre of the trim and secured the trim under pressure.

bright trim and badges were painted over, or simply not replaced if bodywork was required, wheel trims started to disappear, and all in all the fleet started to look ramshackle and neglected. Unfortunately PTE’s seemed to be little better, in fairness, Go Ahead seem to make an effort, and their vehicles are better presented than those of another company of Scottish origin, but I’m afraid that apart from a handful of smaller companies, the glory days are long gone I like the acronym Ronnie has posted, NBC = No Body Cares.I used to travel daily on Country Bus RTs from Godstone and East Grinstead and they all had the plain green discs, except one particular bus (don’t ask me which one).This had the raised circle, mid way between the middle and the perimeter picked out in polished aluminium.Unless some garages stockpiled a quantity for use as dustbin lids!It seems odd to me that after over twenty years and millions of miles in service a wheel trim should come off in such a way as to injure someone and trigger a mass removal.More likely this was a maintenance edict issued by a management rethink.

Whilst it was a long while before wheel nut indicators etc., instances of loose wheels on large vehicles were not uncommon – I saw three trucks lose wheels on the M1 in a two month period in 1967 – and a stricter inspection regime than previously was put into place by many operators of large vehicles.

The trims were a tight fit around the wheel rim so if the spring failed the disk would initially stay in place by centrifugal force.

A change in speed or an uneven road surface would, eventually, dislodge the trim but with LT’s vehicles engines governed to low speeds and, even in the country areas, slow traffic, I just wonder what speeds could be attained to have the trim fly off so as to cause injury.

Manchester was one of a number of undertakings that for a period specified rear wheel trims.

Much to the annoyance of Head Office, certain depots removed them as soon as possible with the regular excuse of ‘lost in service’. The real reasons for removal was brake overheating, time in removing and replacing them when wheels had to be changed and, most importantly, the need to regularly check wheel nuts for tightness which later became a mandatory regular check and, as I understand it, it was at that time that the London wheel trims disappeared in short order. They all seemed to disappear from buses almost overnight. This was, of course long before the days of wheel nut indicators or hubometers, so the ‘falling off’ incident sounds eminently plausible.

Compared with all the plain green ones, this one looked very smart.