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Radiocarbon dating calibration curve

radiocarbon dating calibration curve-46

Because of its importance in Biblical history, Jericho was the second site in the Holy Land, Jerusalem being the first, to feel the excavators’ picks.The first documented excavation was undertaken in 18 by the famous British engineer Charles Warren.

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The first major excavation at Jericho was conducted by an Austro-German expedition under the direction of Ernst Sellin and Carl Watzinger from 1907 to 1909 and again in 1911.Any military force attempting to penetrate the central hill country from the east would, by necessity, first have to capture Jericho.And that is exactly what the Bible (Joshua ) says the Israelites did. Scarred with the trenches of past digs, the impressive mound stretches from top to bottom in this overhead view.Jericho was one of nine tells, or mounds, he excavated in the Jordan Valley in an effort to determine if they were natural or artificial.He dug six vertical shafts and three trenches at Jericho.For example, they traced the Middle Bronze revetment wall around three-quarters of the base of the tell, although at the time they did not fully understand the complexities of the Middle Bronze fortification system.

It was only when Kathleen Kenyon excavated the site in the 1950s that the nature of the revetment wall was clarified, as we will soon see. E.), the time when the Israelites first appeared in Canaan.

The story of the Israelite conquest of Jericho (Joshua 2-6) is one of the best known and best loved in the entire Bible.

The vivid description of faith and victory has been a source of inspiration for countless generations of Bible readers.

After his redating, Watzinger concluded that Jericho was unoccupied (and therefore obviously unfortified) during the Late Bronze period (c. City IV at Jericho – the city that all scholars agree was violently destroyed – was a fortified enclave, drawn at left.

The city’s outer defenses consisted of a stone revetment wall at the base of the tell that held in place a high, plastered rampart.

Above the rampart on top of the tell was a mudbrick wall which served as Jericho’s city wall proper.