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It is plausible that there were several groups who migrated over the years.

The Parsi leader, Ardašir, rushed on to the field like a lion and roared out a challenge. riding a swift horse, charged at Ardašir with his lance … When tragedy beckons even marble becomes soft as wax” (, tr., pp. The Hindu-Parsi alliance was defeated and Muslims ruled the land. Fearing for its safety in the face of the Muslim invasion of Sanjān, Parsi priests took it to the mountain of Bahrot, south of Sanjān, and hid it in a cave for twelve years before taking it to the village of Bansda; the dates are again disputed. There were two major Muslim conquests of Gujarat in the approximate period referred to in the in 14; it is not clear which of the two dates is relevant. The first (the poll tax levied on non-Muslims), but there is no mention of the transfer of Irān-šāh to Navsari through his proposal, a momentous event which would have been mentioned if it had occurred by then (, tr., p. Such events shape community identity and their memory is generally carefully preserved, but precisely because of their importance the stories can be subject to later “elucidation.” Sanjān was at the turn of the millennium a thriving port, and it is plausible that it was a major Parsi settlement as the , tr., pp. The early settlements were in locations with harbors, some of which could accommodate large ships that crossed the oceans, for example Cambay and Broach, while others, such as Navsari, were harbors used by ships pursuing the coastal trade.the plain was distressed by the weight of the elephants … The two leaders were as dragons, struggling with each other with the fury of tigers.The sky was covered with a dark cloud from which rained swords, arrows, and spears. drag him down, and then he cut off his head.” Then the Muslim reinforcements charged. 18-36, supported by Patel; for the translation of the passage on Chāngā Āsā, see Dhabhar, p. There is a hint that it had been installed in Navsari by the time of the second rivayat, often referred to also as the rivayat of Nariman Hōšang (though he is not said to be the bearer of the letter) dated 1480 or 1485 (Paymaster, 1954, p. In short it seems that the Irān-šāh was moved to Navsari sometime in the late 15th century, and that a precise date cannot be given. 82, for a slightly later date, namely 1182, see also Kamerkar and Dhunjisha), but the community there disappears from Parsi history after the “sack” of Sanjān. It has generally been interpreted as indicating a migration from Sanjān northwards to Broach (Bharuch), Navsari, Ankleshwar, and Cambay, but, as Eduljee points out (Eduljee, 1991, p.Then the Ghaznavid ruler, Sultan Maḥmud, pledged to add Sanjān to his kingdom.His army advanced on Sanjān “like a black cloud.” The Parsis stood alongside the Hindus. The sultan’s forces included not only horsemen but elephants “… The variations are due to the fact that the only source, the does not give precise dates but rather uses round figures (e.g., “In this way three hundred years, more or less, elapsed … In this way seven hundred years passed by …,” states that it was written down in 1600, based on oral tradition and it must therefore be used with due caution and appropriate allowances as a historical source, given the way it was composed and transmitted (Stausberg, 2002, I, pp. The account of the exodus begins by describing how a group of devout Zoroastrians in Persia went into hiding in the mountains during a time of fierce Islamic persecution.

The is, however, important as an indicator of the Parsis’ own perception of their settlement in India.

After some time the settlers approached the king for permission to build a temple to house their most sacred grade of fire, an Ātaš Bahrām (see ĀTAŠ). The history of that fire, known as Irān-šāh, their “king of Iran” in exile, is central to much subsequent Parsi history.

The legend states that “three hundred years more or less” elapsed while the Parsis settled in peace in Sanjān and beyond.

Oral tradition relates that Jadi Rana felt apprehensive about granting sanctuary to people of such warrior-like appearance, but the priests convinced the king that they would be 'like sugar in a full cup of milk, adding sweetness but not causing it to overflow’ (a variant relates the placing of a gold ring in the cup of milk; see Axelrod). They emphasized the points where their religion was consistent with Hindu tradition, but some details do not reflect Hindu practice; for example, there was no reason why weddings should be held at night.

Tradition states that the Parsi affirmations of their religion were delivered in sixteen statements (Skt. It has, therefore, been plausibly argued (Eduljee, 1995, pp.

The transferring of the sacred fire ( from Bansda was greeted with joy in Navsari, but it resulted in what might be called substantial “ecclesiastical problems.” The families of priests who had tended the sacred fire from its consecration in Sanjān came with it to Navsari. In September 1686, seven Bhagaria in his home (which is still known as Minocher Homji Agiary; see Jamasp Ashana, pp. Eventually it led to the moving of the sacred fire, which had been temporarily moved to fortified Surat 1733-36, because of Marathi Pindari invasion, and from Navsari to Bulsar in 1740, the date established by Shapurji Hodivala (1927, pp.