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Audioscopiks was nominated for the Academy Award in the category Best Short Subject, Novelty in 1936.

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Two prints, each carrying either the right or left eye view, had to be synced up in projection using an external selsyn motor.Teleview was the first alternating-frame 3D system seen by the public. In 1922, Frederic Eugene Ives and Jacob Leventhal began releasing their first stereoscopic shorts made over a three-year period.Using left-eye and right-eye prints and two interlocked projectors, left and right frames were alternately projected, each pair being shown three times to suppress flicker. The show ran for several weeks, apparently doing good business as a novelty (M. The first film, entitled Plastigrams, was distributed nationally by Educational Pictures in the red-and-blue anaglyph format.The short is notable for being one of the few live-action appearances of the Frankenstein Monster as conceived by Jack Pierce for Universal Studios outside of their company.While many of these films were printed by color systems, none of them was actually in color, and the use of the color printing was only to achieve an anaglyph effect. Land conceived the idea of reducing glare by polarizing light.3D films became more and more successful throughout the 2000s, culminating in the unprecedented success of 3D presentations of Avatar in December 2009 and January 2010.

The stereoscopic era of motion pictures began in the late 1890s when British film pioneer William Friese-Greene filed a patent for a 3D film process.

In his patent, two films were projected side by side on screen.

The viewer looked through a stereoscope to converge the two images.

In January 1936, Land gave the first demonstration of Polaroid filters in conjunction with 3D photography at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.

It is unknown what film was run for audiences at this exhibition.

After a preview for exhibitors and press in New York City, the film dropped out of sight, apparently not booked by exhibitors, and is now considered lost.