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Cadels were an exaggerated form of gothic ) and here to see an illuminated example in a 15th-century Flemish manuscript (Getty Museum, MS 37).

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To learn about the history of calendars, see : calendar year and perpetual calendar.His career as an illustrator got a boost the following year with the publication of Washington Irving's .Lodging near The British Museum in the heart of Bloomsbury, Caldecott made many friends in artistic and literary circles and became the most popular Victorian illustrator of children's books.The one-year period beginning on January 1 and ending on December 31 (following the civil year of the ancient Romans).Most journal subscriptions run for a single calendar year, although some publishers offer a financial incentive to subscribe or renew for multiple years. The part of a papermaking machine consisting of one or more smooth rollers designed to smooth paper after drying, reducing its permeability to moisture by closing the pores in its surface (see this example).Click here to see examples of Caldecott's work, courtesy of Mary Mark Ockerbloom.

Other examples can be seen at the Web site maintained by the Randolph Caldecott Society (UK).

He died at the age of 40 in Florida after undertaking an ill-fated trip to America for his health.

The annual Caldecott Medal for children's book illustration is named in his honor.

Easy to mass produce, cabinet cards appeared in the mid-1860s, replacing the wallet-sized carte-de-visite, and were sold up to about 1905 when the tinted picture postcard became popular. Television service transmitted directly to subscribers via cable connection, rather than broadcast over the air to all who own receivers.

Click here to see a cabinet card portrait of Sigmund Freud's mother, Amalia, and here to see a vignette of Capt. Originally designed to extend service to homes in rural areas, cable TV reached nearly half the homes in the United States by the early 1990s.

The Julian calendar (365 days with an extra day every four years) was adopted from the Romans, but the Roman civil year (beginning on January 1) was replaced by the Christian year in the 7th century.