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Dating a song

It was accepted as canonical because of its supposed authorship by Solomon and based on an allegorical reading where the subject-matter was taken to be not sexual desire but God's love for Israel.For instance, the famed first and second century Rabbi Akiva forbade the use of the Song of Songs in popular celebrations.

Eventually, she admits her lover is in his garden, safe from harm, and committed to her as she is to him. The images are the same as those used elsewhere in the poem, but with an unusually dense use of place-names, e.g., pools of Hebron, gate of Bath-rabbim, tower of Damascus, etc.She summons her lover, using the language used before: he should come "like a gazelle or a young stag upon the mountain of spices".The most reliable evidence for its date is its language: Aramaic gradually replaced Hebrew after the end of the Babylonian exile in the late 6th century BCE, and the evidence of vocabulary, morphology, idiom and syntax clearly points to a late date, centuries after King Solomon to whom it is traditionally attributed.The woman tells the daughters of Jerusalem of another dream. She was slow to open, and when she did, he was gone.She searched through the streets again, but this time she failed to find him and the watchmen, who had helped her before, now beat her.According to vocalist Alice Glass, the song "is about human taxidermy, the idea of preserving the beauty of a lover the way you would an animal".

"Courtship Dating" was received positively by critics, with NME describing it as "synth-pop filled up with muted screams, jerking bass and sparking circuit boards" and "the best piece of humanity-loathing cyborg pop since The Knife's Silent Shout".

In Sephardic Jewish tradition, the Song of Songs is read every Friday night for the divine loving union they see in it; Ashkenazim chant it on the Sabbath during Passover, marking the beginning of the grain harvest and commemorating the Exodus from Egypt.

Scripturally, the Song of Songs is unique in its celebration of sexual love.

It has parallels with Mesopotamian and Egyptian love poetry from the first half of the 1st millennium, and with the pastoral idylls of Theocritus, a Greek poet who wrote in the first half of the 3rd century; Debate continues on the unity or disunity of the Song.

Those who see it as an anthology or collection point to the abrupt shifts of scene, speaker, subject matter and mood, and the lack of obvious structure or narrative.

He reportedly said, "He who sings the Song of Songs in wine taverns, treating it as if it were a vulgar song, forfeits his share in the world to come".