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It was agreed that society keep average global temperatures 'well below' a 2°C (3.6°F) increase from what they were before the Industrial Revolution.Models of future climate scenarios led to the creation of two new risk categories, 'catastrophic' and 'unknown', which deal with low probability high impact scenarios.

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Planetary warming between 3°C and 5°C could trigger what scientists term 'tipping points' such as the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and subsequent global sea-level rise, and the dieback of the Amazon rainforest.How fast the Earth is warming is a key question for decision makers, scientists and the public It would take all three efforts to meet the Paris Agreement goal to which countries agreed at a landmark United Nations climate conference in Nov 2015.Short-lived climate pollutants are so called because even though they warm the planet more efficiently than carbon dioxide, they only remain in the atmosphere for a period of weeks to roughly a decade whereas carbon dioxide molecules remain in the atmosphere for a century or more.Researchers projected warming scenarios that vary based on what societal actions are taken to reduce emissions Their risk assessment stems from the objective stated in the 2015 Paris Agreement regarding climate change that society keep average global temperatures 'well below' a 2°C (3.6°F) increase from what they were before the Industrial Revolution.Even if that objective is met, a global temperature increase of 1.5°C (2.7°F) is still categorised as 'dangerous,' meaning it could create substantial damage to human and natural systems.When assembling these statistics, we have generally retained the wording used by the authors.

Statistics are presented for educational purposes only.

However an increase of more than 5°C will 'unknown' consequences which could lead to the end of life as we know it.

Climate change events which are statistically unlikely but could cause the extinction of humanity could strike by the end of the century, a new study warns.

The authors also note that most of the technologies needed to drastically curb emissions of short-lived climate pollutants already exist and are in use in much of the developed world.

They range from cleaner diesel engines to methane-capture infrastructure.

More than a 5°C rise in heat could result in life-ending consequences for humanity Even if that objective is met, a global temperature increase of 1.5°C (2.7°F) is still categorised as 'dangerous,' meaning it could create substantial damage to human and natural systems.